RECREATION & FITNESS

Tobacco Cessation

When you quit, what happens?

If you quit smoking right now, here is what will begin to happen immediately:

In 20 minutes:
Your heart rate drops.

In 12 hours:
The carbon monoxide (a gas that can be toxic) in your blood drops to normal.

In 2 weeks to 3 months:
Your heart attack risk begins to drop and your lungs are working better.

In 1 to 9 months:
Your coughing and shortness of breath decrease and your lungs start to function better, lowering your risk of lung infection.

In 1 year:
Your risk for heart disease is half that of a smoker’s.

In 5 years:
Your risk of having a stroke is the same as someone who doesn’t smoke.

In 10 years:
Your risk of dying from lung cancer is half that of a smoker’s.  Your risk of cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, bladder, kidney, and pancreas also decreases.

In 15 years:
Your risk of heart disease is now the same as someone who doesn’t smoke.
(Taken from: WomensHealth.gov )

Tools

Have you ever wondered just how much money you’re spending buying cigarettes?

This online calculator will help you figure out just exactly how much of your money goes towards cigarettes.

Resources

You Can Quit Tobacco Too!Quit Tobacco. Make Everyone Proud
This Department of Defense website is focused totally on tobacco use.  There is a message board where smokers can exchange messages or you can have a live chat with a Cessation Coach from 8AM to 10PM EST.  You can develop your own “Quit Plan” and work through this at your own pace.

American Cancer Society
A leader in providing up to date information to the consumer. 

American Heart Association 
Another leader in providing up to date information to the consumer. Follow the “Healthy Lifestyles” link on the left of the homepage for great information on tobacco cessation.

American Lung Association 
Follow the “Quit Smoking” link at the top of the homepage for information on tobacco cessation.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention - not working too well Watch podcasts and learn about the health effects of smoking and secondhand smoke.

DoD Health Affairs Tobacco Free in DoD   
Provides information about quitting in the military

Smokefree.gov
This is an awesome site that’s easy to use. Many resources are available including live chat with a counselor.